Lyric Visions – January 2016 at SOAG

River of Time #3 Golden Moment. 20x20 oil on canvas

River of Time #3, Golden Moment. 20×20 oil on canvas

For the first two months of 2016, artists at the State of the Art Gallery will be showing works made in response to poetry. Sixteen poets were invited by Tish Pearlman, poet laureate of Tompkins County 2013-14, to present their poems to the artists, half of whom will show each month.  I will be part of the first half of the members showing in January. This show runs from January 6-31, 2016. Reception on January 8, 5-8 PM. Poetry readings by the poets Sunday January 17 at 2 PM.

 

My paintings, in a series of 5 panels, is a response to “River of Time,” a poem using metaphors of landscape and season. Michael Jennings describes a moment in the fullness of love, mature and deep, and wistfully recalls the innocent but passionate promise of spring. Winter is never mentioned, but by its very absence, declares its presence looming. The seasons — and ourselves — change slowly, subtly, and mostly unnoticed until we realize that “No one comes back. No one steps twice in the same body.” These panels represent the continuum of time with its colors morphing from the fresh pastels of spring, through the golds of August, into the stark midnight blues and silvers of winter and old age and death.

River of Time #5, Twilight. 24x20, oil on canvas

River of Time #5, Twilight. 24×20, oil on canvas

River of Time #4, Time Flows On. 16x20, oil on canvas

River of Time #4, Time Flows On. 16×20, oil on canvas

I started with the 3rd or middle panel, which represents the present, and then moved to the 4th and 5th panels – the direction in which I am headed. Last, I did panels #2 and #1, in that order, thinking of the past. Come to the gallery and see them all together.

River of Time #1 Nascent Dreams. 24x20, oil on canvas

River of Time #1 Nascent Dreams. 24×20, oil on canvas

River of Time #2 Transition Chaos. 16x20, oil on canvas

River of Time #2 Transition Chaos. 16×20, oil on canvas

 

Permanent link to this article: http://ozolins.com/lyric-visions-january-2016-at-soag/

What’s New for March/April 2015

Treman Marina, August oil on canvas, 12x12"

Treman Marina, August
oil on canvas, 12×12″

Treman Marina, August will be included in ART OF FRIENDS 10 at the First Unitarian Society, 306 N Aurora St, Ithaca NY. The show runs March 12 – April 16, with a reception on Saturday, March 21 from 4-6 pm. This is the tenth year that Diane Newton has gathered together the work of her ever growing network of friends who are artists. It is an eclectic collection of diverse media and styles, and always a treat to see and be a part of.  I painted this small boat scene last August at Treman Marina, and made some corrections in my studio afterwards. It was done entirely with palette knife.

 

Permanent link to this article: http://ozolins.com/whats-new-for-marchapril-2015/

What’s up in February 2015

Well, I’ve been away for a while, meant to get this posted before leaving, then meant to post from the road, but managed to forget to bring along my thumb drive with the required images. I spent the last month in Florida, painting the sunrise In Sarasota and taking photos of exotic birds. Much fodder for new paintings. Oh, well. First things first: These two paintings are up at the State of the Art Gallery until the end of this month. They are part of the series that I did from August Through October around Cass Park and the Marina.

Orange Maple at the Marina, 14x18", oil on canvas

Orange Maple at the Marina, 14×18″, oil on canvas

Friday Behind the Hangar, 14x18", oil on canvas

Friday Behind the Hangar, 14×18″, oil on canvas

Secondly, I have two paintings of French street scenes from the series that resulted from my trip to Paris and the South of France last spring. They are hanging in Decorum Too in the Dewitt Mall and will be up for several months. I went with a group of painters, photographers, and a cyclist, organized by Terry Plater.  We painted in the mornings, and toured various points of historical and/or artistic interest in the afternoons. I worked on these paintings in my studio, using acrylic sketches done on site, and photographs for reference.

Fountain at the Clock Tower Square in Sainte Dionisy, 14x18", oil on canvas

Fountain at the Clock Tower Square in Sainte Dionisy, 14×18″, oil on canvas

Courtyard in Calvesson, 14x18", oil on canvas

Courtyard in Calvesson, 14×18″, oil on canvas

Permanent link to this article: http://ozolins.com/whats-february-2015/

New paintings November 2014 at SOAG

 

4 Trees & a Bush, oil on canvas, 14x18", sold

4 Trees & a Bush, oil on canvas, 14×18″, sold

I am a little late in posting my news for November, as this is the last week for the member’s show at the State of the Art Gallery, and I have three new paintings on display. They must be good, because two of them will be going to new homes at the end of the month. So… this is the last chance ever to see them, unless you are friends with their new owners.

Four Trees and a Bush is the second plein air painting of the Summer Dozen this summer. I went up to the Cornell Arboretum, with the Fair Weather Painters, and painted the view from across the small pond. I was not very pleased with it when I was done, so there were extensive revisions to make in my studio.I liked the way I painted the trees in the top half of the painting, but the dark reflections and pond scum of the bottom were not working to make a composition. My inclination was to call this one a scraper and toss it, but being busy, it stayed on the wall long enough for me to realize that if I invented the tree reflections, I would have a nice play between the vertical elements and the horizontal/diagonal elements. I also eliminated another bush that I painted just because it was there, adjusted the

Four Sailboats, Treman Marina, 16x12, oil on canvas, sold.

Four Sailboats, Treman Marina, 16×12, oil on canvas, sold.

intensity of the ground cover around the pond, and voila, it just snapped into being.

The second painting, Four Sailboats, was a fun painting for me on a very hot July day at the Treman Marina, looking back across the marina towards the bath house. I was painting with the Fair Weather Painters again. It was very congenial company. I loved the way the white sailboats were lined up, reflecting in the water. As in the painting above, I chose a very small segment of a large landscape, and totally avoided putting in any sky, so it is clearly just about those four boats. It was a new subject for me, and the perspective of the boats was tricky, but I managed to stay loose, and free in my mark making.

The third painting was done in September, after the weather turned rainy and chilly. I almost canceled out of that painting session, but this time, I had put out an invitation for the Fair Weather Painters, and I did not want to miss an opportunity for congenial company. After a rainy start to the day, the sun came out, and I set off for the marina. No sooner did I drive down Cliff Street, but it started drizzling. I was still hopeful that it would pass. When I got to the Marina, it was still drizzling, but there was a patch of clear sky over Lansing, The wind seemed to be blowing from that direction, so I was hopeful. I settled on this scene because I was intrigued by the way the land swung around the water in the marina. The lack of sunshine created a situation where the colors were soft but intense. Damp, gray, with a ferocious wind, I was painting very quickly, spreading very thin applications of paint with the largest palette knife. I was wearing

Beyond the Marina, Cold and Wet, oil on canvas, 16x20

Beyond the Marina, Cold and Wet, oil on canvas, 16×20

several layers of fleece, and a raincoat, but the wind was sucking the heat out of me. After a bit, I was shivering, but I wanted to at least cover the canvas once. By the time I was done, I was seriously shaking  and my teeth were chattering noisily. I couldn’t believe that my companion was still painting in the field beyond. I hastily threw my things into my car, made arrangements to meet for some hot soup and headed off to the Island Cafe on Taughannock Blvd. to warm up. I was pleased with the way this painting turned out, and made only very few minor revisions in the studio.

 

 

Permanent link to this article: http://ozolins.com/whats-new-november-2014/

October 2014: Multiple Show Venues

This month, In addition to my show at the Moosewood Restaurant being extended for another month,  I have work at the State of the Art Gallery in Ithaca, and at the George Waters Gallery in Elmira,

At the State of the Art Gallery, for the month of October, I am showing one piece which is a memorial to Renisha McBride.

For Renisha McBride oil on canvas, 18x24"

For Renisha McBride oil on canvas, 18×24″

Renisha McBride

On November 2, 2013, Renisha McBride was coming home from a party when she crashed her car and needed help. It was 4:45 AM, and her cell phone was dead, so she went knocking on doors in a Dearborn Heights, Michigan, neighborhood. She banged on the windows and door of Theodore Wafer’s house loudly enough to wake him. He came to the door with his shotgun, and without opening the screen door, shot Renisha dead. He claimed self-defense, he was frightened and thought she was a burglar trying to break into his house. Renisha McBride was only 19 years old. She was an African American young woman. After the initial shocking news, there were the usual media reports trying to show flaws in Renisha’s character. Was she drinking? Had she used drugs? Why was she out and alone so late at night? There were the usual reminders that Michigan was a “Stand your ground” state where it was not a crime to shoot someone if you felt threatened – even if you had no objective grounds for your fear. Then, there was a long silence on the matter. I was beside myself with anger that here was another young black person’s life tragically cut short, and no one cared. There were no protests, no petitions to sign. It seemed as if there would be no justice. This painting springs from my outrage. If Renisha had been white, would she be dead? I once ran out of gas in the middle of the night and knocked on doors looking for help. It never crossed my mind that someone would shoot me.

In this case, it did not take a riot to finally get an indictment. Theodore Wafer was tried, and in August, 2014, was convicted of 2nd degree murder and sentenced to 17-32 years in prison.

Dyer Ave. (NYC), acrylic on canvas, 20x20

Dyer Ave. (NYC), acrylic on canvas, 20×20

I also have one piece in a group show at the George Waters Gallery in Elmira, NY. It is the last painting from the urban forms series that I started  in 2013, and I think, the most successful in that genre.

Permanent link to this article: http://ozolins.com/october-2014-multiple-show-venues/